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“National Institutes of Health”

Stimulation of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cell iodination by PSK subfractions.

A protein-bound polysaccharide, PSK, extracted from the mycelium of Coriolus versicolor (Fr.) Quel, stimulated the
iodination (incorporation of radioactive iodine into an acid-insoluble fraction) of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear
cells (PMN), human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells and human myeloblastic leukemic ML-1 cells. In contrast, PSK did
not significantly increase the iodination of other cultured cell lines (U-937, THP-1, L-929, T98G, BALB 3T3). The PSK
stimulation of iodination of both PMN and HL-60 cells depended on incubation time and temperature, and was significantly
suppressed by the presence of myeloperoxidase inhibitors. Among various PSK subfractions, the highest molecular weight
fraction (MW greater than 200 kD), or the fraction precipitated at pH 4.0-4.5, stimulated the iodination most. In contrast,
natural and chemically modified glucans had little or no stimulation activity. The active PSK subfractions synergistically
enhanced TNF stimulation of PMN iodination. The data suggest the presence of some unique components in PSK which
directly stimulate the iodination of myeloperoxidase-positive cells.
PMID: 2369086 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE][…]