Displaying posts tagged with

“Diphenhydramine”

Polysaccharide peptides from COV-1 strain of Coriolus versicolor induce hyperalgesia via inflammatory mediator release in the mouse.

Polysaccharide peptide (PSP), isolated from Coriolus versicolor COV-1, has been widely used as an adjunct to cancer chemotherapy and as an immuno-stimulator in China. In this study, the anti-nociceptive effects of PSP were investigated in two different pain models in the mouse. In the acetic acid-induced writhing model, initial studies showed that PSP decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhing by 92.9%, which, by definition, would constitute an analgesic effect. However, further studies showed that PSP itself induced a dose-dependent writhing response. Studies on inflammatory mediator release showed that PSP increased the release of prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and histamine in mouse peritoneal macrophages and mast cells both in vitro and in vivo. The role of inflammatory mediator release in PSP-induced writhing was confirmed when diclofenac and dexamethasone decreased the number of writhing responses by 54% and 58.5%, respectively. Diphenhydramine totally inhibited the PSP-induced writhing. In the hot-plate test, PSP dose-dependently shortened the hind paw withdrawal latency, indicative of a hyperalgesic effect. The hyperalgesic effect was reduced by pretreatment with the anti-inflammatory drugs. In conclusion, the PSP-induced hyperalgesia was related to activation of peritoneal resident cells and an increase in the release of inflammatory mediators.[…]